Certified public manager program

Question

The School of Natural Resources and Extension took over and began launching a program called “certified public manager” about three years ago. They have invested a great deal of time and money in making this work, but to date, have had few, if any, participants. The information about the cost of this program is not easily obtained, so can’t be reported here, but at a minimum there is one staff person working on the program and a director overseeing it and other programs. Why are the Anchorage and Sitka Cooperative Extension Service offices being closed, with faculty and staff laid off, and this program retained? It is a program that has no students and could easily be eliminated with no impact to Extension service delivery, and money and effort would be saved.

Response

Cooperative Extension has made an investment in a new workforce development program over the last couple of years. Working to relaunch the certified public manager program in Alaska is just one part of that effort. Revenue from the program’s training contracts has been used to cover the annual fees and travel to the annual board meeting of the national accrediting association. Other than salaries, of which only a slice is devoted to CPM, state funding has not been put toward the CPM program.

—Fred Schlutt, vice provost for extension and outreach