UAF Homepage News

In the early 1990s, Janet Collins was hiking in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge when she saw “Camp 163” labeled on her map. Intrigued, she later looked up Camp 163 in Donald Orth’s Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. Her curiosity led her to Ernest Leffingwell, the subject of a biography she has written and Washington State University Press just published.

Read full story »


A walk-through replica of the permafrost research tunnel in Fox, Alaska, will be part of a display opening Nov. 3 at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland, Oregon. The exhibit is a collaborative effort between OMSI and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Read full story »


Gathering two dozen people at UAF to collaborate on research is hardly rare. But when half of them come from an isolated North Slope village almost 400 miles away, the situation becomes decidedly more unusual. That was the case in early June, when members of the board of directors of the Kuukpik Corp. — the Alaska Native village corporation for the community of Nuiqsut — met with scientists studying the adaptive ability of northern communities.

Read full story »


Ocean particles near the equator efficiently transport carbon deep underwater, according to a new study that used high-resolution cameras to document this climate-related phenomenon. An international team that included Andrew McDonnell, assistant professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, employed the revolutionary cameras to track how carbon and nutrients cycle through the ocean and around the globe.

Read full story »


Goodnews Bay students have engaged in hands-on, professional science work to benefit their community and the state of Alaska during the past two summers. The students used ground-penetrating radar, Russian peat corers and GPS to help calculate the effects of climate change in their western Alaska village. They assisted researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks on a project to assess Goodnews Bay’s ability to adapt to flooding, erosion and other hazards associated with a warming planet.

Read full story »



The quiet students sitting in the back row remind Col. Wayne Don of himself the most. They’re why he returns every summer to speak with students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Rural Alaska Honors Institute. The 1989 RAHI alumnus shares how he got out of his comfort zone by asking questions in his criminal justice classes. While attending RAHI, Don decided that even though he was shy, he would become a public speaker.

Read full story »


Research team members have five new sensors that allow them to continuously monitor ocean acidification conditions in Alaska’s Kachemak Bay. The sensors, installed in September, allow researchers from University of Alaska Fairbanks, Kachemak Bay Research Reserve and Kasitsna Bay Laboratory to collect a range of environmental data.

Read full story »


Subsistence hunters across the North Slope will soon use computers to monitor temperatures in several ice cellars. The University of Alaska’s Geographic Information Network of Alaska has partnered with an Arctic Slope Regional Corp. subsidiary to create prototypes of the computers. Seven will be installed in spring 2018, with refinements to follow.

Read full story »


Life exists everywhere you look. Even on glacier ice, home to inch-long worms, snow fleas, bacteria and algae. When gathered by the millions on the ice, algae cells can help make the water they need to survive. Alaska scientists recently studied this living agent of glacier melt.

Read full story »


Posts navigation