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In her study of one of the farthest-north lynx populations in North America this summer, Claire Montgomerie used her ears. While looking at the satellite tracker a female lynx was wearing, Montgomerie saw the animal was hanging around a hillside north of the Arctic Circle, not far from Coldfoot.

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In 1963, 23-year-old geologist David Whistler sat down for lunch on a rocky hilltop one mile above Kennicott Glacier. With one hand on his sandwich and the other on his miner’s pick, he flipped over rocks. One of them made him pause. Embedded in the stone was a row of sharp teeth.

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Deep inside the Geophysical Institute is Hui Zhang’s office. Three desks line the mostly bare, white walls. Behind the door is a large bookshelf filled with scientific papers, textbooks and journal publications. The barren appearance of her office would not lead someone to conclude that the professor of physics had been there for five years. “I just don’t have time to decorate,” Zhang said.

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A group led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks Upward Bound program has been awarded a $2.1 million National Science Foundation grant to use emerging technologies as a way to increase the interest of high school low-income and first-generation-to-college students in science fields.

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A team of researchers, including the curator of earth sciences at the University of Alaska Museum of the North, has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study dinosaur and other fossil remains from Alaska’s North Slope. The $454,801 award will further research on the Cretaceous Prince Creek Formation, origin of most of the dinosaur bones in Alaska.

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